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Happy 239th July 4, 2015

Posted by David Card in Media.
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This year’s patriotic plug. Though its star is one of those anarchist New Englanders, rather than a more reasoned and rational Virginian, big chunks of the miniseries were filmed in Williamsburg.

Happy Fourth. Throw another burger on the grill for me. As always, I’ll bring Mom’s potato salad (never tastes the same twice, but always good). And I think I’ll keep adding the extra pickles.

 

Best of 2014: Movies March 13, 2015

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After my humiliating defeat at the hands of my sister in the family Oscars pool, it’s finally time for this post. But first, the usual stats, courtesy of Box Office Mojo.

  • Last year’s domestic box office gross was down 5 percent, after two pretty good years in a row. And Box Office Mojo is counting sales from Number One film American Sniper as 2014, even though most occurred in January 2015 and beyond. Last year, nothing cracked $400 million; three movies have $300+ million so far: Sniper, Hunger Games 3A, and Guardians of the Galaxy. Recent big years had multiple $400-million releases, topped by a monster like The Avengers with $600 million or Avatar at $750 million.
  • As usual, almost all of last year’s Top 10 were either cartoons or superheroes. Katniss and Chris Kyle pretty much qualify as superheroes, and the phenomenally crappy Transformers movie might as well be a cartoon. Guardians and The LEGO Movie did just fine as as franchise-starters at over $330 million and $250 million, respectively. Disney and Warners are in good shape, and while Fox may be gnashing its teeth over fading franchises, no studio had a huge-budget flop.

Among those big hits, Sniper was solid, but Guardians got more critical love than it deserved, because it felt fresher than most played-straight superheroics. But come on, who makes a mix tape with “Pina Colada” and “Cherry Bomb?” Most of my favorites of the year fell well below the Top 10 earners.

Source: flickr user Llaunes i cel·luloide 03

Source: flickr user Llaunes i cel·luloide 03

Which is not to say I’m a complete snob. I go to the movies weekly, and love blockbusters as well as indies. I’m a hard grader who reserves 5 stars in Rotten Tomatoes or Flixster for true classics. Last year I saw seven 3.5-star movies – not a bad tally. My personal Top 10 were:

  • Boyhood – This exercise in Texas slackerealism is a stunt, but an effective one. Just about the entire cast is so good – esp. the chemistry between Hawke and Coltrane – you actually care what happens to them. Why is that so rare?
  • Only Lovers Left Alive – Hiddleston and SWINTON are the coolest vampire couple since Bowie and Deneuve.
  • Whiplash – DI meets the drummer. The two leads are terrific, it’s superbly shot and edited, exciting, and will actually provoke discussion. Whiplash has little to do with jazz – it’s more like a corny sports movie – but I love corny sports movies.
  • The Babadook – The best classic horror movie in years. Two great performances (Davis and Wiseman), a good look and sound design, and just as scary thematically as “literally.” Can’t wait to see what Jennifer Kent does next.
  • Stalingrad – Old-fashioned, sentimental, propagandistic? But also epic. Great Russian cast overcomes under-written parts and matches the 3D spectacle.
  • Mr. Turner – One wonders if the eccentric bloke really grunted that much, but some of the vignettes are brilliant, most of the cast is very, very good, and the cinematography really does hint at the sublime.
  • American Sniper – Largely apolitical and super-patriotic, it’s still gripping and troubling. Cooper’s superb, un-flashy performance wasn’t completely ignored by the major awards nominators. Glad he was on our side – hoohyah!

To get to 10, the 3-star movies that will hold up best included:

  • The Grand Budapest Hotel – For once, Anderson’s fussy art direction works wonders, Fiennes is a marvel, and there’s even a hint of heart. A sad and nostalgic one.
  • Fury – Old-fashioned nearly to the point of cliche, but delivers some powerful scenes. Pitt is charismatic and the tanks look authentic, even if the tracers don’t. Three good war movies in one year?
  • John Wick – Lean and mean. Exciting choreographed violence shot coherently FTW.

In the based-on-a-true-story category, I liked Get on Up a little better than Foxcatcher, which was a little too cold, and far more than Selma, which had some effective scenes but was really only a few cuts above Movie-of-the-Week material. The best animated movie I saw was Miyazaki’s The Wind Rises (I didn’t see LEGO yet). It felt three dimensional with no need for 3D glasses. Birdman was overheated and thematically shallow.

Possibly that affected my Oscar picks, though I try to predict, not cheer. I had Keaton for Best Actor, but only went 14 for 24, my worst in a few years, with only three of the big six. Boyhood was robbed.

Best of 2014: Music February 1, 2015

Posted by David Card in Digital Home & Personal Tech, Media.
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I’m awfully late posting my “best of,” so I’ll get right to it. More or less in order, the following were my favorite new releases of 2014:

  • D’Angelo “Black Messiah” – smooooove
  • Wovenhand “Refractory Obdurate” – my favorite quasi-Christian rocker is still full of fire and brimstone
  • St. Vincent “St. Vincent” – doesn’t sound like anything else, esp. when she plays guitar
  • The Choir of Gonvill & Caius College, Cambridge “In Praise of St. Columba” – if Celtic monks didn’t sound like this, they should have
  • Sturgill Simpson “Metamodern Sounds in Country Music” – ignore the title: he’s got some Hank Williams in him
  • TV on the Radio “Seeds” – my obligatory “catchy, quirky alterna-pop” for this year
  • Run the Jewels “Run the Jewels 2” – actually makes some political points
  • Prince’s twin releases: “Art Official Age” and “Plectrumelectrum” (with 3rdeyegirl) – he’ll always be the best funk rocker
  • Robert Plant “Lullaby…and the Ceaseless Roar” – obligatory “old geezer who hasn’t lost it”

There were 3 or 4 good singles on the Pixie’s two EPs, Lucinda Williams’ double album was about one-album’s worth of solid, and everybody should listen to “Primus and the Chocolate Factory” at least once.

I bought 29 albums or EPs — 7 from the back catalog. That’s about the same as in 2013, and half of what I bought before streaming caught on. I don’t think I’m the industry’s worst nightmare, i.e., a former heavy-album buyer who switches over to $10/month. No, that would be the never-buyers who get all their music from YouTube. Mark Mulligan is right: though $10/month is a fabulous deal for fans,we’re going to need another price point before it’s mainstream. And Aram Sinnreich seems to have been on to something back in the Jupiter days: it took mobile streaming to take adoption beyond the niche aficionados.

Pals who work in and around the industry and I agreed it was pretty mediocre year. When I look back at what I liked best over the last few years, I’m struck by the relative lack of sure-to-be-standards. I won’t fall back on the “no unifying cross-audience genre” argument, nor the idea that YouTube, iTunes, and Spotify have killed the album. (Singles are the native format for popular music; albums were an unnatural phenomenon of the ’70s.)

I’ll just say that, compared with the last 5 years, I didn’t hear any breakthroughs in my favorite genre to match Parquet Courts, Japandroids, Titus Andronicus, Surfer Blood, Black Keys, or Savages. “RTJ2” is no “Yeezus,” “1989” can’t touch “Pure Heroine” or “Bangerz,” The War on Drugs is a poor man’s The National, and please, FKA twigs vs. M.I.A? no comparison.

 

Happy 238th July 4, 2014

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stars-and-stripes1

 

This year’s patriotic plug. The Americans – though I don’t remember a Virginian among them – give our heroes a bit of a bloody nose.

Happy Fourth. Throw another hot dog – or burger – on the grill for me. As always, I’ll bring Mom’s potato salad (never tastes the same twice, but always good).

Best of 2013: Movies February 17, 2014

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I like to kick these posts off with some box office stats, courtesy Box Office Mojo.

  • The money spent in U.S. movie theaters was flat versus last year (and tickets sold down), when The Avengers set some records with over $600 million in sales at the same time that Hunger Games and The Dark Knight Rises broke $400 million. This year, only the Hunger Games sequel and Iron Man 3 cracked the $400 million mark.
  • The top 10, as usual, comprised sequels, cartoons, and superheroes, sometimes in combination. How did Gravity sneak in? By being a really good movie that was also a crowd-pleaser, and worth seeing in Imax or 3D. I’m still baffled by the Oz movie (which I didn’t see). Does it qualify as a franchise? Pixar made it into the top 10, but didn’t get an Oscar nomination. Can we blame Disney?

Let me disagree with the critics who say it was a good year. I go to the movies in theaters just about once a week. I like blockbusters and genre films as much as serious movies for grown-ups, and I’m a hard grader. I reserve the 5s on a 5-star scale for all-time classics like Casablanca, Chinatown, and Duck Soup. I rated fewer 3s this year than in 2011 and 2012. I saw a lot of 2.5-star movies this year.

My two favorites of the year earned 3.5 stars each:

  • Gravity – It’s uncharitable to wish Gravity were actually about something. Its visuals inspire awe and panic, its physics is totally convincing, it’s superbly cast, and the creators apparently invented some new movie technology.
  • Inside Llewyn Davis – The rare Coen Brothers movie with a heart, and all the better for it. Is it a little depressing? So is trying to make a living while making art.

To round out a top ten list, here are the best of the 3-star movies I saw this year:

  • Mud – An endearing, meandering, Southern shaggy dog story. Tremendous cast and atmosphere. It’s a “triple-six real-deal.”
  • The Great Gatsby –  Leo nailed it, even if Carey Mulligan was mis-cast. The hip hop worked, and everyone looked fabulous.
  • American Hustle – Audacious, but only partly successful. You’ve got to be Scorsese to pull off voice-over narration, the pacing’s inconsistent, and the comedy and satire are, uh, uneven. Lots of great performances, but what is Russell’s point? American Bullsh!t was the original title…
  • Rush – Cliched? Macho? Hans Zimmer? Well, yeah, it’s a Formula 1 movie. And it was the funnest summer flick. The leads radiate charisma and it’s got a great ’70s look. See it on a big screen.
  • Fruitvale Station – I wanted more outrage, but in the long run maybe its almost too low-key approach was the way to go. Superb cast empowered by the very assured first-time director and screenwriter.
  • Captain Phillips – Taut and thoughtful. Hanks and Abdi are terrific and I’ll forgive the shakycam because Greengrass is one of the few active directors that shoot action scenes where you always know what’s going on. Ends with a real kick in the chest.
  • All Is Lost – Truly harrowing, and I only saw it on an airplane’s small screen.
  • The Grandmaster – Kung fu isn’t better in rain, smoke, snow, or slowmo, but it sure is prettier. This one actually takes off when it turns into a romance, but, oh, man, that fight scene by the train…

As for some of the other big movies of the year? While Luhrmann was seduced by – and seductive on – the romance of Amuhrican capitalism, I’m pretty sure Scorsese was not. But consider the source material. Wolf of Wall Street was at least a half an hour too long to justify its 2-3 great scenes. While the romance in Her worked, the dialogue did not. 12 Years a Slave was beautifully shot, and mostly well-acted, but it’s about as subtle and thoughtful as Mandingo. Worse, it’s oddly unfeeling. In Blue Jasmine, Blanchett out-Blanches Blanche, but the class and wealth commentary loses its sting because it’s set in some timeless, out-of-touch Woodyland where Brooklyn is an undesirable place to live, people take computer classes to learn about “operating systems,” and mooks from Queens comprise the San Francisco working class.

Best of 2013: Music December 21, 2013

Posted by David Card in Digital Home & Personal Tech, Media.
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My favorites of 2013 line up better with Rolling Stone’s than with Pitchfork’s. Must be getting old.

This year I bought about 30 albums, all digital downloads. I don’t go for singles often, even if that is the natural medium for pop music.  (The modern version of the EP is appealing.) That number is a little less than last year, and again this year, almost all new, rather than back catalogue. I’ve got to discover some new “old” favorites.

My downloading may be down due to my use of music streaming services, just like Mark Mulligan and the ex-Jups and I have been forecasting for so long. I still like Rhapsody’s curation and info, but Spotify’s catalogue is starting to be noticeably better. I like Spotify’s apps, especially the ones that link me to reviews from professionals at media like Rolling Stone and Pitchfork. I wish This Is My Jam were better integrated, and I usually forget that Facebook aggregates a lot of music info.

Anyway, roughly in order, the following were my favorite new releases of 2013:

  • Parquet Courts “Light up Gold” – easily – predictably? – my most-played. Incredibly catchy stoner punks from Austin via Brooklyn
  • Kanye West “Yeezus” – hurry up with my damn croissants. Pushes a lot of envelopes
  • The National “Trouble Will Find Me” – drones engagingly, and with some feeling
  • Lorde “Pure Heroine” and Miley Cyrus “Bangerz” – two pop divas craft some great singles. Miley might bear more listens; Lorde has more promise
  • Queens of the Stone Age “….Like Clockwork” – heavy-ish rock, not too many power ballads
  • Robyn Hitchcock “Love from London” and David Bowie “The Next Day” and Richard Thompson “Electric” – a trio of old geezers deliver the goods: near-Beatles, near-“Scary Monsters,” and near-guitar god
  • Savages “Silence Yourself” – stunning debut even if we’ve heard it before from Erase Errata
  • Steve Earle “The Low Highway” – one song’s called “21st Century Blues.” That about sums it up
  • Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds “Push the Sky Away” – minor-key Cave still pulses and throbs
  • M.I.A. “Matangi” – the only kind of world music you should listen to

Huge ad merger’s scale argument doesn’t hold up July 29, 2013

Posted by David Card in Uncategorized.
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Two of the biggest advertising holding companies, Omnicom and Publicis, would combine to make the biggest mega-agency ever. But is that a good thing? I’m skeptical.

As Om points out, all companies have to be tech companies these days, and advertising powers the business of two of the most important forces in tech, Google and Facebook. Even mainstream media thinks the merger is a big data play. Big tech players like Oracle, Salesforce, and Adobe are bulking up on marketing and advertising technologies through acquisition, and maybe we are heading for a showdown between advertising “art and science.

I’m not going to dwell on how hard it is to pull off mergers of equals, or that client overlap and conflict will open up competition from other agencies. But think of what ad agencies do for their clients. They’re creative consultancies who buy media efficiently in order to reach specific audiences.

I’m hard-pressed to see how getting bigger is going to make the combo more creative. Nor will sheer mass help it respond to one of the key opportunities in marketing: i.e., figuring out how to really use social media for something other than cheap inventory.

The combo may have more buying heft when negotiating media buys – but that’s in television. With the proliferation of ad networks and analytics, buying specific digital audiences is a pretty level playing field, if not a commoditized skill. In theory, the merged company could look at the data from all of its campaigns, digital and traditional, to better understand buying patterns and audience interest, and properly asses the impact of branding campaigns on purchases. That would be huge.

But do you really think a massive organization with all of its fiefdoms and differing “religions” on market analysis – let alone different platforms and tools – is going to pull that off?

 

Happy 237th July 4, 2013

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libertytreeflag

 

This year’s patriotic plug, courtesy of a sideways recommendation from Cormac. But White House Down just isn’t Independence Day. As far as I can tell, there aren’t any real Virginians in either. And I’d vote for Jamie Foxx over Bill Pullman, especially if he wore Jordans and packed a rocket launcher.

Happy Fourth. Throw another burger on the grill for me. As always, I’ll bring Mom’s potato salad (never tastes the same twice, but always good).

Gigaom Research launches IT buyer surveys May 22, 2013

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Gigaom Research is launching the first of a series of 2013 surveys of enterprise IT decision makers. This will help drive our analysis on cloud infrastructure, big data, and enterprise mobility issues. To gain further insights into cloud computing issues, we’re collaborating with North Bridge Venture Partners. Together, we’ll share survey results and compare attitudes on the future of cloud computing among mainstream IT buyers, leading-edge customers, and technology vendors. We’ll present some of our findings next month at our annual Structure event in San Francisco.

I encourage GigaOM Pro subscribers and other readers to take North Bridge’s survey – the more responses we get, the deeper we’ll be able to dig. You can see their 2012 results here.

Below is a result from last year’s GigaOM Research survey. I wonder how attitudes are evolving.

[dataset id=”160565″]

Unleashing the European app economy May 9, 2013

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While the markets for apps that run on mobile and social platforms have exploded in the U.S., they’re just getting underway in Europe. GigaOM Research is teaming up with the Digital Enterprise Research Institute at NUI Galway and the European Commission to better understand the potential European opportunity, and to identify potential hurdles to growth that EC policies might address. We’re kicking off the project with a workshop in Brussels on June 14.

We profiled apps developers and their business models in this 2012 survey-driven report with the help of the Application Developers Alliance, and we’ll be doing similar scoping for the Eurapp project, as well forecasting spending and job creation, and using workshops and crowdsourcing challenges to help guide EC policy ideas. Eurapp is part of the Startup Europe initiative of the European Commission’s Digital Agenda, which aims to help tech entrepreneurs start, maintain and grow their businesses in Europe.

The Shape the Future workshop in June will have invited speakers from the apps industry, including Samsung, Tyba, and Betapond. The format will be a series of lightning talks featuring experts in the space, followed by Mapping Sessions to probe attendees’ collective thinking and examine some of the issues to be tackled in growing the app economy in Europe. After the workshop, we’ll crowdsource solutions to address bottlenecks and to suggest potential success strategies via two innovation challenges via the Innocentive platform.

Attendees at the event include: Peter Elger, CTO of Betapond; Kumardev Chatterjee, founder of the European Young Innovators Forum; Kevin Mobbs, Director of Innovation Programs EMEA at Innocentive; and Eurapp project lead John Breslin, who is also co-founder of boards.ie and the app company StreamGlider. I’ll be there as well.

The workshop will be held in BU33, Auderghem in Brussels on 14th June 2013. There are very limited places available for the workshop, but you can apply to attend at http://eurapp.eu/

 

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