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Can Online Publishers Mine Digital Marketing Dollars? September 30, 2005

Posted by David Card in Media.
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Good, scary column by Rebecca Lieb on the risk of where the real digital marketing dollars might go, i.e., not to online publishers. We’ve written extensivly on tapping into the brand loyalty of online bloggers and posters, sponsorships from publishers that aim at those dollars, and some of the new marketing technologies.

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18 More Reasons to Live in New York or California September 30, 2005

Posted by David Card in Commerce.
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Or Massachusetts, in a pinch. A bunch of states are gathering their local sales tax rates into a database to boost their lobbying efforts to get online retailers to collect sales tax.

    The states that have signed on are Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota and West Virginia. Five more — Arkansas, Ohio, Tennessee, Utah and Wyoming — are in the process of finalizing the requirements needed to join, while Washington, Texas and Nevada are in earlier stages.

Oh, wait. Rats.

    New York and California, with two of the country’s biggest state economies, have so far not signed on because they aren’t yet able to easily standardize their local tax laws for the project.

Tinker Bell Does MP3 September 29, 2005

Posted by David Card in Digital Home & Personal Tech.
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Sassy!

tinkerbellmp3.jpg

Disney’s done branded CD and DVD players before, and Mix Clips aren’t too original — although ultra-small kid-targeted music formats are usually clips-only, and sold as keychains. At $49 (128MB), it’s priced to move.

Walt Disney Co. is set to announce today the release of a $49 digital audio MP3 player aimed at 6- to 12-year-olds. Like most digital audio players, Disney’s Mix Sticks allows users to download music from the Internet or from CDs copied on a computer. But the device also allows users to plug-and-play music by inserting postage-stamp-size memory cards called Mix Clips, which can hold about the same amount of music as a CD. One of the four models, which also play Windows Media Audio music files, features Tinker Bell on the casing with the slogan “Sassy Pixie.”

Is There a Business in Blogs, Part XXXVII? September 28, 2005

Posted by David Card in Media.
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Claims $3,500 a month in revenues. Claims 126,000 daily visitors. (Surely that’s worth more than a few million bucks a year?) Steals photos for content. Gets front page treatment from the Journal. (Yes, the “whimsical” middle column.)

Still, a much more entertaining and informative story that the Journal’s front pager on “old media goes after the Internet” part whatever. Broadband critical mass, ad revenues are back, young audiences are online, lots of acquisitions. But you all know this. This story is a summary for beginners.

Funny that the stories have absolutely nothing to do with each other other than placement.

Singing Sweet Ditties? September 27, 2005

Posted by David Card in Media.
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This is a joke, right? (I probably just doubled its traffic.) Maybe not. Word of mouth, huh?

    Itís so bad itís good? Only they went too far and itís actually bad!

Yet Another Doomed Music Media Format September 27, 2005

Posted by David Card in Media.
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That’s what the world needs — another physical format for music that offers nothing but capacity. And copy protection, of course. Maybe it’s some kind of attempt at retro cool. Hey, it’s called “Gruvi.”

    SanDisk Corp., the No. 1 maker of the familiar flash cards used with digital cameras and other products, today is announcing an effort to turn the technology into a medium for distributing prerecorded content. The goal is to let consumers buy cards that come preloaded with music or movies, or can be filled by downloading content over the Internet.

Yes, most people see a higher value in physical than digital music, correctly so. (See Figure 10.) I’m working on our new music survey analysis, and attitudes haven’t changed. But we have some good new detail on paying downloaders and digital subscribers. And there’s some hints of substitution — i.e., digital for physical — along with some good news about migration to paid services. But enough teasing. Let me go finish the report.

UPN Closes Loop September 27, 2005

Posted by David Card in Media.
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UPN.com now links to Google Video, which is streaming the first episode of “Everybody Hates Chris.” Whew, glad that‘s all settled. Even if Google Video likely gets less traffic than a similar deal with any of the big three portals, UPN — and Google, of course — are getting some press coverage. Possibly more than if it were a more logical deal.

Update: Loving Chris on Google September 26, 2005

Posted by David Card in Media.
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Aha. If you query “everybody hates chris” on Google, you now get both the Google site hosting the first ep and UPN.com. Still no mention on UPN.com.

What Is Your Network Site For? September 26, 2005

Posted by David Card in Media.
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UPN is letting Google — Google? not a TV channel at a portal? — host the premiere episode of its new hit “Everybody Hates Chris” online. Do you think UPN.com links to it? Nope, just a 7-minute excerpt. UPN even appears to be buying the key-phrase “Everybody Hates Chris” on Google, but linking to UPN.com, not to the Google-hosted ep.

Of course, UPN.com only gets about 400-500K visitors a month (comScore doesn’t appear to track video.google.com in its mainstream product), so maybe it’s doing the right thing.

Which Little Orange Logo Do You Think Makes More Sense? September 22, 2005

Posted by David Card in Media.
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Which New York Times Co. online publication has the smarter strategy? The Boston Globe highlights its columnists’ RSS feeds in orange, while the Times uses an orange T to indicate that its columnists are for paid subscribers only. They both have the same parent company.