jump to navigation

The Dubba Dubba Dubba Dubba Dubbaya Cee May 2, 2006

Posted by David Card in Media.
trackback

On the other hand, the NY Times lets CBS chief Les Moonves & Co. just speak for themselves. Producing these gems:

    Mr. Moonves explained that the CW name had been thrown together hurriedly because of the rushed nature of the merger last winter. The C came from CBS and the W from Warner Brothers. “And we certainly weren’t going to call it the WC network,” Mr. Moonves said.

Well, we certainly will. I can’t believe this joke hasn’t been made.

    Mr. Moonves emphasized that as a new network, CW wants to add at least a few new shows, if only to signal that it has something of its own to offer.

    “At CBS scheduling meetings, I always say: Don’t fall in love with the new girl, don’t get carried away,” Mr. Moonves said. “With the CW, I might say: It’s O.K. to fall in love with the new girl, instead of the old wife.”

Okay. I’m just not touching that one.

    “The WB was not especially diverse creatively,” [Shari Anne Brill, vice president and director of programming for Carat USA] said, pointing to the lineup of angst-ridden, virtually all-white teenage-oriented shows that have dominated its programming.

    By contrast, UPN grouped a batch of comedies with African-American casts on Mondays, giving it a stronger appeal to black viewers. But it has had more problems than WB in getting high prices for its programs.

    WB took in about twice as much money from advertisers during the last upfront sales period. Now the two networks will have their shows mixed together. “We have to find the right flow,” [Dawn Ostroff, the president of entertainment and chief programmer] said.

And Veronica Mars is only a “probably contender” for renewal. I gotta say, I don’t really want to see her go to college. Continuing to quote probably violates fair use, but what the heck:

    So what about the name? At the meeting in March, the marketing department offered a list of about 15 potential names.

    The selections were aimed at being as hip as possible: the Evo network; the Now network. There was a proposal to call it NXTV (as in “Next TV”) or XYTV (for the audience generations being spoken to), or something even more avant-garde: the Angle network.

    Then the market research people chimed in. Based only on the attention the announcement of the merged new network had received, the name CW had achieved a national awareness level of a surprising 48 percent, according to their own surveys.

    “It took us three years to reach a level like that with the WB,” [Barry Meyer, the chairman of Warner Brothers] said.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: