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Wildcard Prediction December 4, 2008

Posted by David Card in Media.
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I’m probably not allowed to say this, and I’m certainly not paid to do so. But here’s the wildcard prediction, based on the announcement of a new Online Services chief at Microsoft, who’s an ex-Yahoo engineering manager rather than a media or product guy:

Microsoft spins off MSN to Yahoo, which also buys a chunk of AOL. Microsoft and Time Warner remain minority shareholders in the resulting uber-portal. Search and ad networks powered by Microsoft technology.

– Unites consumer email, IM, a couple of powerful ad networks, and a lot of valuable online content properties
– Doesn’t solve integration issues, social media missteps, or lack of a leadership role in video
– Isn’t necessarily competitive in search, but has potential
– Is very competitive in display. Perhaps too competitive?
– Leaves a lot of mobile questions unanswered
– Doesn’t necessarily unite search and display marketplaces or attribution techniques
– Is going to be a hard sell as a partner for branded media

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Changing Locations December 3, 2008

Posted by David Card in Media.
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OK; so we’ve moved my Jupiter 2008 blog archive over to the new place. So regular readers should now follow my professional blog at Forrester. I’m a contributor to the Marketing Leadership role-based blog, but you can bookmark or RSS me separately, if you like.

And follow me on Twitter at davidcard.

I’ll move the ancient history over to a personal blog at some point.

Hope this doesn’t wreck my page rank or Technorati cred.

There’s a Reason It Was So Cheap December 3, 2008

Posted by David Card in Media.
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There’s a reason it was so cheap.

    Alan Gutman, the lawyer representing Axl and Guns N’ Roses, sent a scolding letter (which cited Advertising Age’s coverage of the campaign), to Larry Young, president-CEO of the Dr Pepper Snapple Group. The letter stated that Dr Pepper’s campaign had exploited the singer’s reputation and the “eagerly awaited” album, and stated that payment would be sought for the unauthorized use of the Guns N’ Roses brand.